Upcoming one-day conference, Oxford, January 2018

As this year closes in already filling up my diary for 2018… First event London the books for me is a brilliant and rammed one-day event in Oxford about ‘materialities and mobilities in Education’. 

I’ll be presenting my latest about how technology is shaping transitions into higher education. The entire day looks amazing and I’m hoping to catch as many talks as possible. 
Apparently the event is fully booked AND there’s a waiting list… So if you’re coming, I’m looking forward to seeing you there! 
Full details of the day below 
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Monday January 8 2018

Materialities and Mobilities in Education – One-Day Conference

School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QY, UK (Gottman Room)

Kindly sponsored by the Economic Justice and Social Transformation research cluster

9.30 – 10.00am: Registration

10.00 – 11.00am: Welcome and Keynote 1

‘Spatial imaginaries’ and the transition to university: an intersectional analysis of class, ethnicity and place (Michael Donnelly, University of Bristol).

11.00 – 1.00pm: Parallel Sessions

 1a (Gottman Room)

i. Mobile preschools, mobilities and materialities (Danielle van der Burgt and Katarina Gustafson, Uppsala University)

ii. Moving beyond immobility: narratives of undergraduate mobility at the ‘local’ college (Holly Henderson, University of Birmingham)

iii. We’re going on a journey: materialities and mobilities in the Outward Bound Trust (Jo Hickman Dunne, Loughborough University)

iv. Building colleges for the future: pedagogical and ideological spaces (Rob Smith, Birmingham City University)

v. The construction of hypermobile subjectivities in higher education: implications for materialities (Aline Courtois, University College London)

1b (Gilbert Room)

i. Materiality and meaning-making: towards creative mapping praxis on ‘post-conflict’ Belfast (Amy Mulvenna, University of Manchester)

ii. Materiality and the formation of transnational identities among British Ghanaian children schooling in Ghana (Emma Abotsi, University of Oxford)

iii. The school bus as agentic assemblage (Cathy Gristy, Plymouth University)

iv. Learning ‘the feel’ in the wooden boat workshop: material perception as understanding (Tom Martin, University of Oxford)

v. Relational mobilities: global citizenships between international ad local private schools (Sophie Cranston, Loughborough University)

1.00 – 1.30pm: LUNCH (Gottman Room)

1.30 – 2.15pm: Keynote 2

Choreographies of belonging: Reimagining ‘local’ students’ everyday (im)mobiities in Higher Education (Kirsty Finn, Lancaster University)

2.30 – 4.30pm: Parallel Sessions

Session 2a (Gottman Room)

i. International study in the global south: linking institutional, staff, student and knowledge mobilities (Parvati Raghuram, Open University)

ii. Higher education mobilities: a cross-national European comparison (Rachel Brooks, University of Surrey)

iii. Transnational encounters. Constructions of schools and (post)colonialism across continents 1945 – 1975 (Ning de Conick-Smith, Aarhus University)

iv. The space in-between: the materiality and sociality of the international branch campus in China (Kris Hyesoo Lee, University of Oxford)

v. Materialities and (im)mobilities in transnational capacity-building projects in higher education (Hanne Kristine Adriansen, Aarhus University)

Session 2b (Gilbert Room)

i. ‘In two places at once: academics with caring responsibilities, conference mobility and the role of communication devices’ (Emily F. Henderson, University of Warwick)

ii. Data and school spaces – materialisations, circulations and temporalities (Matt Finn, Exeter University)

iii. The role of technology in shaping student identity during transitions to university: how technology is affecting the way students experience and conceptualise the university as a social, academic and physical space (Harry T. Dyer, University of East Anglia)

iv. Making space for academic work (Mary Hamilton, Lancaster University)

v. Materialities and mobilities of the university: widening participation students’ narratives of success (Emma Wainwright, Anne Chappell and Ellen McHugh, Brunel University London)

vi. Between omnipotence and immobility: a comparison of banking, Hollywood and further study as popular pathways amongst graduates from an elite university in New York (John Loewenthal, Oxford Brookes University)

4.45 – 5.30pm: (Gottman Room) Closing Remarks; Book Launch and Wine

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One day symposium on ‘researching young people, digital technologies and health’

Apologies for the lack of posts here lately! It’s been a manic summer full of running around, writing, and planning my next research project, and I’ve already sunk back into the new year teaching schedule…

If you’re curious about some of the things I’ve been doing this summer, you can listen to this podcast I recorded over the summer, or read this article I wrote for The Conversation. I’ll be updating this blog on my new research project as it progresses and evolves.

For now, please find below some information about a brilliant upcoming event in Manchester in a few weeks time. The lineup is brilliant, including some of my favourites;  Deborah Lupton and Huw Davies. I’m busy on the Friday, otherwise I’d be there soaking up the wealth of knowledge, but I hoping others will go and share some of the ideas on Twitter!

 

All the information can be found below!

 

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Choosing research participants for Digital Research

I’m just writing up the sampling section of my thesis, so I’m revisiting this now. I’m so glad I decided to allow the participants to tell me their story. As I say in the blog, the data collected may not be considered data-rich in the sense that Kozinets implies, but nonetheless, this paper was left with incredibly rich data.

Harry T Dyer

What constitutes an appropriate or useful research participant for Digital Research? What criteria do we want our research participants to match? What even is a normal Digital user?

These are some of the questions we can often begin to ask ourselves when approaching Digital Research. What sort of participants do we want, and what makes a participant particularly useful/useless? What traits should we look for in our participants?

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Reflection and Diffraction

This is just awesome, some really interesting thoughts for any researcher on the importance of reflection but also the restrictions. Well worth reading and thinking about

View from a hovel

I’ve been trying to get my head around why posthumanists assert that diffractive thinking is more useful than reflection. Karen Barad uses optical analogies throughout her agential realist treatise and I want to play around with her ideas using images and some creative thinking. Truly understanding this holds great importance for the methods I employ in research as well as my research in transitions. Reflection and reflexivity (personal transformation as a result of reflection) are core components of qualitative and transition research. If an alternative idea works better, I need to own it.

Reflection

Barad talks about reflection in terms of a mirror and reflexivity as a mirror of mirrors.

Mirror, Mirror on the wall, who is the fairest of them all? That’s what I do when I look in a mirror. I check myself out. Am I too fat? Do I look good in this colour? This…

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#IStillFacebookBecause …

This week, a fascinating hashtag started up on Twitter asking users why they still used Facebook. According to Twitter (when I last checked) 40000 odd tweets had been sent by users asking them why they still used Facebook, and the replies were fascinating, funny, and provided a really interesting insight into what’s happening on and with Facebook.

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