Choosing research participants for Digital Research

I’m just writing up the sampling section of my thesis, so I’m revisiting this now. I’m so glad I decided to allow the participants to tell me their story. As I say in the blog, the data collected may not be considered data-rich in the sense that Kozinets implies, but nonetheless, this paper was left with incredibly rich data.

Harry T Dyer

What constitutes an appropriate or useful research participant for Digital Research? What criteria do we want our research participants to match? What even is a normal Digital user?

These are some of the questions we can often begin to ask ourselves when approaching Digital Research. What sort of participants do we want, and what makes a participant particularly useful/useless? What traits should we look for in our participants?

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Reflection and Diffraction

This is just awesome, some really interesting thoughts for any researcher on the importance of reflection but also the restrictions. Well worth reading and thinking about

View from a hovel

I’ve been trying to get my head around why posthumanists assert that diffractive thinking is more useful than reflection. Karen Barad uses optical analogies throughout her agential realist treatise and I want to play around with her ideas using images and some creative thinking. Truly understanding this holds great importance for the methods I employ in research as well as my research in transitions. Reflection and reflexivity (personal transformation as a result of reflection) are core components of qualitative and transition research. If an alternative idea works better, I need to own it.

Reflection

Barad talks about reflection in terms of a mirror and reflexivity as a mirror of mirrors.

Mirror, Mirror on the wall, who is the fairest of them all? That’s what I do when I look in a mirror. I check myself out. Am I too fat? Do I look good in this colour? This…

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#IStillFacebookBecause …

This week, a fascinating hashtag started up on Twitter asking users why they still used Facebook. According to Twitter (when I last checked) 40000 odd tweets had been sent by users asking them why they still used Facebook, and the replies were fascinating, funny, and provided a really interesting insight into what’s happening on and with Facebook.

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